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More On The Series

Delicate Imperfections

As a part of our #WiltWIP campaign, we have partnered with women who inspire us across the country. We recognize them as pioneers and those that know the rules well enough that they can break them. This culture of creativity is something we share with this unique group of women across an array of fascinating trades, and we’re looking forward to telling their story. They are in many ways versions of ourselves, but are also carving out their own path through their work, without further adieu meet Isabel, a truly innovative ceramicist.

"I’m really interested in texture…it’s a lot about how things feel to me and being really nubular." Follow her @isabelhalleyceramics

We discovered Isabel through her pieces and fell in love with her aesthetic, we’re certain you will as well. Her pieces have evolved since she began working with porcelain and we’re thrilled that Wilt will have a place in this lineage. Every piece of every collection is a true work in progress.

Based in NYC, Isabel Halley finds inspiration to create her ceramic pieces in herself and her surroundings. Isabel invited Wilt to her studio space and showed us the time and attention that goes into creating these beautiful and functional items. Her workspace was inspiring and we couldn’t respect her commitment to make something so exquisite. Keep reading for the story...

How did you get your start making ceramics?

Well I got started in art school, but I’d always been interested in ceramics. I did it in high school and I thought it was kind of trite and not that interesting. But it’s really interesting actually.

Ceramics is also a really accessible medium especially for women. It’s based in craft but it’s so much more than that. It’s an interesting safe place for women to begin making things, and I think that’s the same way that cloth is or embroidery is.

Can you tell us a little bit about your process?

I started making these pinch bowls and it kind of started from one bowl. I started experimenting with larger sizes and figuring out how much clay was conducive to that. I was experimenting with how far I could stretch the clay and how thin it could go. So that’s been something that’s been kind of interesting to me.

The clay I use is porcelain so it’s about being really thin. People associate porcelain with something that’s really precious and something that’s really perfect and so I like that kind of juxtaposition of it being messy or you know kind of wabi sabi.

And so for the bowls, I’m really interested in texture and these bumpy vases that I make it’s a lot about how things feel to me and being really nubular—and you know being inspired by nature.

What is the process and time that goes into creating one of these?

It’s the same as making pinch pots in art class when you were a kid or the way that you might play with silly putty or whatever. It’s just making a pinch pot, but for me making it as thin as possible.

So I start with a ball of clay and I stretch it all the way out and then I compress the lips otherwise it can dry very quickly on the sides. It’s also about working very quickly because if you don’t then it will crack and that’s a big thing. If this takes longer than 15 minutes, it’s not going to be any good.

They each take 15 minutes to make, one week to dry. Drying is the most meticulous part. It’s in the kiln for 2-3 days, then out to blaze, back in the kiln, then luster, then back in the kiln. So it’s in for a total of 3 fires. It’s so much planning.

Are you working on any big projects right now?

I am! I’m making rainbow clay, but for you guys I’m working on something a little different. What I’m working on for you now is one of these bowls. I don’t ever do them with a silver rim, but I’m going to for Wilt. I thought that that would work really well. I feel like silver and asymmetrical clothing are really connected somehow.

Shop her favorite looks...

The Influencers

Classically trained in pattern making and draping, Roxanne Heptner founded Wilt in 2009 on a mission to create a line of beautifully shaped, uncomplicated tees. Wilt garments are made with a tailor’s attention to detail and our finishing and coloration processes give every garment a unique look. Knowing the rules has allowed us to break them. From sketches, to pinning, to production, Wilt is centered around a creative process that speaks to its true craft.

Inspired by this, we have partnered with a group of women across the world to detail the work, craftsmanship, and creativity that comes with doing something they love. On this page, you’ll find these women who have inspired us. Follow along here and on our Instagram as we get to follow their creative process in creating something truly unique.

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The Influencers

Classically trained in pattern making and draping, Roxanne Heptner founded Wilt in 2009 on a mission to create a line of beautifully shaped, uncomplicated tees. Wilt garments are made with a tailor’s attention to detail and our finishing and coloration processes give every garment a unique look. Knowing the rules has allowed us to break them. From sketches, to pinning, to production, Wilt is centered around a creative process that speaks to its true craft.

Inspired by this, we have partnered with a group of women across the world to detail the work, craftsmanship, and creativity that comes with doing something they love. On this page, you’ll find these women who have inspired us. Follow along here and on our Instagram as we get to follow their creative process in creating something truly unique.

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